Saturday, July 14, 2018

1 Timothy 2:5,6 – There Is One God (Deuteronomy 6:4; Galatians 3:20; Ephesians 4:6; 1 Corinthians 8:6)

1 Timothy 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus,
1 Timothy 2:6 who gave himself as a ransom for all; the testimony in its own times. – World English

Deuteronomy 6:4 - Hear, O Israel: Jehovah our God is one Jehovah. -- American Standard Version.

1 Corinthians 8:6 - yet to us there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we to him; and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and we through him. 
-- World English.

Galatians 3:20 - Now a mediator is not between one, but God is one. 
-- World English.

Ephesians 4:6 - one God and Father of all, who is over all, and through all, and in us all. 
-- World English.

Trinitarians often give the above verses as proof that there is only one true God, but they then claim that this "one God" is three persons. They evidently overlook that 1 Corinthians 8:6, Ephesians 4:6, and 1 Timothy 2:5 directly present this "one God", not as being three persons, but rather as only one person, and that one person is the God and Father of our Lord Jesus. (Ephesians 1:3) 1 Corinthians 8:6 actually excludes Jesus from being the "one God", for he is presented as being "one Lord" through whom are all. The Father is the "one God" who is the source; the Son is the "one Lord" who is the instrument.

In order to make it appear that this one God is three persons, they usually follow up with something like: "The Father is God (John 6:27; Romans 1:7; 1 Peter 1:2). The Son is God (John 1:1, 14; Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Hebrews 1:8; 1 John 5:20). The Holy Spirit is God (Acts 5:3-4; 1 Corinthians 3:16)." Since, according to them, the word GOD is applied to all three, this must mean that all three of these "persons" are the "one God", and thus they assume this to prove their triune God theory. Of course, this disregards the Hebraic usage of the words for GOD and assumes the false dichomoty that GOD must mean either the one true God or else a false god. Additionally, one has to create a lot of assumptions regarding each verse which have to added to, and read into each verse, in order to make the verses appear to harmonize with their trinune God doctrine.

1 Timothy 2:5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus,
1 Timothy 2:6 who gave himself as a ransom for all; the testimony in its own times.

The scripture at 1 Timothy 2:5 is indeed a very good verse to show that there is only one true God [Supreme Being-- source of all] ; however, if this verse proves there is only one true God, who is that only one true God proven to be in this verse? Trinitarians evidently fail to notice, or wish their readers not to notice, that Jesus is not included there as the only true God, but only the God and Father of Jesus (Ephesians 1:3; 1 Peter 1:3) is spoken of in the as the “one God” of whom are all. Thus, this verse actually proves the only true God to be one person, not three persons, since the “one God” spoken of is only one person, not three persons.  In fact, Jesus is excluded in this vers from the being the “one God”, since Jesus is described as the mediator between the “one God” and man.

Trinitarians also often cite 1 Timothy 2:5 as proof that Jesus is still a man, although the scripture does not say that, but it does say that the man Christ Jesus gave himself a ransom for all. The trinitarian uses the imagined “dual nature” or alleged “hypostatic union” dogma to imagine and see in the verse what is not there. Having discussed this elsewhere, we recommend that one see:






Friday, July 13, 2018

1 Thessalonians 5:23 – Is Man A Trinity? (Genesis 1:26,27)

(This study is not yet fully updated)
1 Thessalonians 5:23, along with Genesis 1:26,27, is often presented by trinitarians as an alleged proof of their trinity dogma. Evidently, the thought is that man is presented as a trinity in 1 Thessalonians 5:23 and that since man is God’s image (Genesis 1:26,27), then God also is a trinity.


VERY (ONE) BUT THE GOD OF THE PEACE MAY SANCTIFY
0846 1161 3588 2316 3588 1515 0037 0846_99
humas holoteleis kai holokleeron humwn to
YOU COMPLETELY WHOLE, AND WHOLE IN (EVERY) PART OF YOU THE
4771_7 3651 2532 3648 4771_5 3588
pneuma kai hee psuchee kai to swma amemptws en
SPIRIT AND THE SOUL AND THE BODY BLAMELESSLY IN
4151 2532 3588 5590 2532 3588 4983 0274 1722
tee parousia tou kuriou heemwn ieesou christou
THE PRESENCE OF THE LORD OF US JESUS CHRIST
3588 3952 3588 2962 1473_8 2424 5547
teereetheiee
MAY IT BE KEPT.
5083
Westcott & Hort Interlinear


1 Thessalonians 5:23 speaks of the spirit, soul and body of the Christian church as a whole; it is certainly not describing man as a trinity as taught by the trinity doctrine. The trinity doctrine teaches that the Father is wholly, fully God, the Son is wholly, fully God, and the Holy Spirit is wholly, fully God, and that God is without parts. According to the trinity doctrine, God is three separate and distinct persons, but each person is wholly, fully God. Thus, if man is such a trinity, each human being is three separate and distinct persons, each of which are wholly, fully, the human being. We would have to say that human soul is a separate and distinct person of each man, and yet at the same that the human soul is all of what each man is. Additionally, we would have to say that the spirit of a man is another separate and distinct person of each man, and yet the spirit of a man is also fully the man. Furthermore, the same would have to be true of the body; the body of each man would have to be a person separate and distinct from the other two persons, and yet that body would have to be fully the man himself. 

The reality is, however, Paul was not praying that the all the individual fleshly bodies of the believers be presevered until Christ returned.

In Acts 4:32, we read that “The multitude of them that believed were of one heart and one soul,” and in Ephesians 4:4, the Apostle points out that there is one BODY AND ONE SPIRIT. In Philippians 1:27, he prays that Christians may “stand firm in one spirit, with one soul striving for the faith of the gospel.” The true spirit has been preserved in the faithful called-out ones.

Please see our study:



Genesis 1:26,27

God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the sky, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” God created man in his own image. In God’s image he created him; male and female he created them.

This scripture is often combined with 1 Thessalonians 5:27 as proof that man, being a trinity, is the image of God, and thus, this means that God is a trinity. What is evidently being imagined, assumed and added to what is written in Genesis 1:26,27, is that man’s being made in the image of God means that man is likewise a trinity, as man is alleged to be presented in 1 Thessalonians 5:23. In reality, “God (ELOHIM)” in Genesis 1:26 is presented as being one person who speaks to at least another person.

In what way, then, was man created in the image of God? We know that man is separate from other animals due to his ability to reason, speak languages, etc. We can also reason that man was created in God’s image in that he was endowed with moral qualities like that of his Creator, but with the ability to choose to do what is right, or to do what is wrong. In this sense man was “crowned with the glory of God”, but after disobeying, he became short of the glory of God. (Psalm 8:5; Romans 3:23) However, the scripture itself points to the fact that to man was given a dominion. That is, that just as God rules over all the universe, so he appointed to man a dominion, to have all things on earth put under his feet. (Psalm 8:6-8) At present, due to man’s fallen condition, all things are not now under man’s feet. (Hebrews 2:8) But in the age to come this dominion will again be restored to mankind.

There is nothing in either Genesis 1:26,27 or 1 Thessalonians 5:23 that says that man’s being made in the image of his Creator means that man is a trinity of three person, each separate and distinct from each, but each of which is fully the man. We find nothing about a trinity at all in either Genesis 1:26,27 or 1 Thessalonians 5:23.

See also our study:

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The Default Reasoning Regarding Jesus and His God


Trinitarians, especially, approach the scriptures with the assumption that all their trinitarian formulations are true, and most often appear to assume that the trinitarian assumptions are default, and thus appear to claim that because they can think up this, and think up that, which has to be added tot he scriptures, in order "see" their trinitarian doctrine in the scriptures, that what they imagine and assume is thus fact, and the default reasoning.

The "oneness" believers often do similarly, with their claims that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all three one person.


Nevertheless, the default scriptural reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the Supreme Being who sent Jesus; the default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since Jesus speaks the words given to him from Jehovah the only true Supreme Being. -- Exodus 3:13,14; Deuteronomy 18:15-19; Isaiah 61:1; John 3:34; 5:19; 6:29; 7:16,28; 8:26,28,42; 10:36; 12:44-50; 14:10,24; 17:1,3,8; Acts 3:13-26; 1 Corinthians 8:6; Galatians 4:4; Hebrews 1:1,2; 1 John 4:9,10.

The default scriptural reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since it was Jehovah, God and Father of Jesus (Ephesians 1:3), who is the Only one who is the source of all (1 Corinthians 8:6), Jehovah is He who anointed and sent Jesus (Isaiah 61:1; John 17:1,3), prepared a body of flesh for Jesus (Hebrews 10:5), and made Jesus a little lower than the angels so that Jesus could offer that body of flesh with its blood to Jehovah his God for our sins.  -- Matthew 26:26-28; Luke 22:19; Romans 3:25; Colossians 1:14; Ephesians 5:2; Hebrews 2:9; 9:14; 10:10; 1 Peter 2:24; 3:18; 1 John 1:7; Revelation 1:5.

The default scriptural reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, who who made the covenant with Abraham and the seed of Abraham -- which seed is Christ (Galatians 3:14,16; Luke 22:29), through whom the Father -- Jehovah -- will bless all the nations. -- Genesis 22:18.

The default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since it was Jehovah, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, who raised Jesus up as His prophet who is like Moses. -- Exodus 3:14,15; Deuteronomy 18:15-19; Acts 3:13-26.

The default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since Jesus was sent by Jehovah, speaks the words of Jehovah as his God and Father, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Exodus 3:14,15) who raised and glorified His Son. -- Deuteronomy 18:15-22; Matthew 22:32; 23:39; Mark 11:9,10; 12:26; Luke 13:35; 20:37; John 3:2,17,32-35; 4:34; 5:19,30,36,43; 6:57; 7:16,28; 8:26,28,38; 10:25; 12:49,50; 14:10; 15:15; 17:8,26; 20:17; Acts 2:22,34-36; 3:13-26; 5:30; Romans 15:6; 2 Corinthians 1:3; 8:6; 11:31; Colossians 1:3,15; 2:9-12; Hebrews 1:1-3; Revelation 1:1.

The default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since Jesus receives his power and authority from, Jehovah, his God and Father. -- Deuteronomy 18:15-19; Psalm 2:6-8; 45:7; 110:1,2; Isaiah 9:6,7; 11:2; 42:1; 61:1-3; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23,24; 37:24; Daniel 7:13,14; Micah 5:4; Matthew 12:28; 28:18; Luke 1:32; 4:14,18; 5:17; John 3:34; 5:19,27,30; 10:18,36-38; Acts 2:22,36; 3:13-26; 10:38; Romans 1:1-4; 1 Corinthians 15:27; 2 Corinthians 13:4; Colossians 1:15,16; 2:10; Ephesians 1:3,17-23; Philippians 2:9-11; Hebrews 1:2,4,6,9; 1 Peter 3:22.

Additionally, we reason that Jesus is not Jehovah, since, the only true God, the God and Father of Jesus, never is "given" power at all; THE GOD AND FATHER OF JESUS IS POWER INNATE, the source of all. (1 Corinthians 8:6) Jehovah, being the source of all might, power, does give to Jesus power, but not the power of being the source of all power, since it is obvious in that all that is given from the only true Supreme Being, that of being the only true Supreme Being is exempt from being given to anyone. (John 17:1,3; Ephesians 1:3,17-23; 1 Corinthians 15:27) All is still "of" Jehovah, the source of all, "through" the one whom only true Supreme Being has made -- appointed -- as "Lord" over the church and the world; Jesus, the one appointed, only has power "through the strength of Jehovah", "his God". -- Psalm 2:6; Isaiah 9:7; 11:2; 61:1-3; Ezekiel 34:23,24; 37:24; Jeremiah 23:5; Micah 5:4; Matthew 28:18; Luke 1:32,33; Acts 2:36; 5:31; 1 Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 1:3,17-23; Philippians 2:9-11.

The default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since it is Jehovah who designated as being "Most High", and Jesus is designated as being "son of the Most High." (Genesis 14:22; Psalm 7:17; 83:18; 92:1; Luke 1:32; John 13:16) Jesus is never identified in the Bible as being the Most High.

The default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah, since throughout the entire Bible, Jehovah is ALWAYS presented as being one person, and He is ALWAYS distinguished from being the Messiah, whom He anointed. Not one scripture identifies Jesus as being the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, despite however many scriptures one may think beyond what is written in order to "see" such a thought in the scriptures. The onus is not upon one accepts this default to disprove all the claims made by others that would claim that Jesus is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. It is only for such to present what the scriptures do say, and what they do not say, and show the harmony of the scriptures without adding all the assumptions needed to support the idea that Jesus is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

Thursday, July 5, 2018

1 John 3:16 - Did God Almighty Lay Down His Life For Us?

1 John 3:16 - By this we know love, because he laid down his life for us. We ought to lay down our lives for the brothers. -- World English Bible version.

Many, reading the King James Version, of the above scripture, have claimed this verse says that God himself laid down his life for us. No, it was not God who laid down his life for us. The KJV translators added the words "of God" to the verse.


The words “of God” are not in the original, and should not have been introduced into the translation, though they are found in the Latin Vulgate, and in the Genevan versions, and in one manuscript. They would naturally convey the idea that “God” laid down his life for us; or that God himself, in his divine nature, suffered. But this idea is not expressed in this passage as it is in the original, and of course no argument can be derived from it either to prove that Christ is God, or that the divine nature is capable of suffering. The original is much more expressive and emphatic than it is with this addition: “By this we know love;” that is, we know what true love is; we see a most affecting and striking illustration of its nature. “Love itself” - its real nature, its power, its sacrifices, its influences - was seen in its highest form, when the Son of God gave himself to die on a cross. For an illustration of the sentiment, see the notes at John 3:16; John 15:13. -- Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 John 3". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". 
No scripture presents the idea that in order for God's justice to appeased through propitiation, the death God Himself would required. The scriptures reveal that all that is needed to appease God's justice is the offsetting price (anti-lutron) of a sinless man who would give his fleshly body with its blood in sacrifice to God on man's behalf. It was the man, Christ Jesus, who gave himself in sacrifice to God for our sins. -- Matthew 26:26-28; John 6:51; 8:23; Luke 22:17-19; Romans 3:25; 5:12-19; 1 Corinthians 11:24; 15:21,22; Ephesians 5:2; 1 Timothy 2:5,6; Hebrews 2:9; 10:10; 1 Peter 2:24; 3:18; 1 John 1:7; 2:2; 4:9,10.

Nevertheless, even as 1 John 3:16 reads in Scrivener's Textus Receptus of 1894, it should not be understood as meaning that God gave Himself as an offering to Himself for sins, otherwise, since the condemnation would have been eternal except that that it be offset, this would mean that God is now be eternally dead. The reality is, however, that it was the man, Christ Jesus, who had, while in the days of his flesh (Hebrews 5:7), the glory that is a little lower than the angels (Hebrews 2:9), who gave himself to God in sacrifice for our sins (Ephesians 5:2; 1 Timothy 2:5,6) Hebrews 9:14,28; 10:10,12), and he is now, as a man having the glory that is a little lower than angels, eternally dead. The wages of sin that came upon Adam would have been eternal had not another taken upon himself the eternal penalty of sin, thus releasing Adam and all of Adam's descendants from that penalty. -- Romans 5:12-19; 1 Corinthians 15:21,22; 1 Timothy 2:5,6.

1 John 4:9-10 -  In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him. [10]  Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.

"God" above refers to only one person, and that one person sent His Son. The default reasoning is therefore that the one sent is not the one who did the sending, that is, Jesus is not "God" who sent him.

Even so, God's love is seen in that He sent His son to die for our sins.  -- John 3:16,17; 1 John 4:9.10. 

God's justice was emphasized during the time before Christ. His justice demanded the death penalty upon all due to Adam's sin. God's love combine with His wisdom, however, saw to it that all were condemned in the one man, so that only one sinless man would be needed as a propitiation (appeasing) of God's justice. This is what Paul wrote about in Romans 5:12-19; 1 Corinthians 15:21,22; 1 Timothy 2:5,6.

Some of our related studies:

Basis for Atonement





Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Psalm 89:27 – Jehovah’s Firstborn King

Also I will make him my firstborn, higher than the kings of the earth. — Psalm 89:27, World English

(not fully updated for this site)


Some point to Psalm 89:27 as an illustration that “firstborn” is used to mean other than the first one to be brought forth by a father, usually in an effort to demolish the idea that Colossians 1:15 means that Jesus had a beginning.

Biblically, we find that usually the position of firstborn is given to the first son born in a family or lineage. Many times, however, that honor is taken away from the one who would have held that honor and given to another, as in the instance of Esau and Jacob (Israel). (Genesis 25:29-34; 27:6; Romans 9:12,13; Hebrews 12:16) Likewise, David was given the honor of firstborn over the kings of the land due to Saul’s unfaithfulness, although Saul was the the actual one who held the position of the firstborn as king over Israel, since he was actually the first king of Israel.

This does not do away with the truth that one is a part of the whole of that which he is firstborn. It certainly does not mean that either David’s kingship or that of Saul had no beginning. Note also that David was a king, thus would be included in the group over which he is appointed firstborn.  It certainly does not give us any thought that to be begotten means that which begotten has no beginning.

Related RL Studies

Colossians 1:15 – Did Jesus Have a Beginning?

Colossians 1:15,16 – Genitive and “For”

Beginnings in the Bible

Genesis 34:7 – The firstborn nation, Israel

Revelation 1:4 – Who Is, Was, To Come – Jesus? 

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Romans 9:32,33; 1 Peter 2:7,8 – Stone Of Stumbling – Jehovah Or Jesus?

Isaiah 8:13-15

Yahweh of hosts, him, shall ye hallow, – And let, him, be your fear, and let, him inspire you with awe; So shall he become a hallowed asylum, – But a stone to strike against, and a rock to stumble over unto both houses of Israel A trap and a snare to the dweller in Jerusalem; And many, shall stumble among them, – and fall and be torn, and snared, and captured. — Rotherham’s Emphasized Bible translation.

Romans 9:32,33

Why? Because they didn’t seek it by faith, but as it were by works of the law. They stumbled over the stumbling stone; even as it is written, “Behold, I lay in Zion a stone of stumbling and a rock of offense. And no one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

1 Peter 2:7,8

For you therefore who believe is the honor, but for such as are disobedient, “The stone which the builders rejected, Has become the chief cornerstone,” and, “A stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense.” For they stumble at the word, being disobedient, whereunto also they were appointed.

Our trinitarian neighbors (and some others) often point to Isaiah 8:13-15; Romans 9:32,33 and 1 Peter 2:8 as proof that Jesus is Jehovah (Yahweh). Basically, the idea is that since Jehovah is alleged to be spoken of as a stone of stumbling in Isaiah and Paul applies this to Jesus in Romans, then this should prove that Jesus is Jehovah. However, what was Paul’s intentions in quoting Isaiah 8:14? Let us see exactly what Paul did say:

Why? Because {they did} not {pursue it} by faith, but as though {it were} by works. They stumbled over the stumbling stone, just as it is written, “BEHOLD, I LAY IN ZION A STONE OF STUMBLING AND A ROCK OF OFFENSE, AND HE WHO BELIEVES IN HIM WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED.” — New American Standard Bible translation

Paul appears to give indirect quotations of two scriptures: Isaiah 8:14,15 and Isaiah 28:16. He first quotes Isaiah 28:16, in which it is Jehovah who speaks: “I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone”. Then he jumps to Isaiah 8:14,15 for the phrase: “for a stone of stumbling and for a rock of offense”. And next returns to Isaiah 28:16 for the last part: “he who believes shall not be in haste.”

It should be easy to see from Isaiah 28:16 that the stone is laid by Jehovah, and thus the stone is not Jehovah. Paul’s application of these scriptures actually gives us reason to believe  that Jesus is not Jehovah, since Jesus is the stone laid by Jehovah. Paul, by his application, further shows that Isaiah 8:14,15 is referring to Immanuel, not to Jehovah.

Realizing that Paul’s thought is not to say that Jesus is Jehovah, but that Jesus is the stone laid by Jehovah, his quote of Isaiah 8:14,15 should be viewed as making it clear that Isaiah 8:14,15 is speaking of Jesus (Immanuel --Isaiah 8:8,10), not Jehovah. Anyone who has done any in-depth study of Isaiah knows that the prophecy of Isaiah often changes from one person to another without clear indication of context that such is being done. Even verses 1 and 2 of this very chapter, Isaiah begins to quote Jehovah and suddenly stops in verse 2 and 3 and begins to speak of himself. The Hebrew text itself bears no distinction that notes this.

The earlier context speaks of the prophetess who conceived and bore a son. (Isaiah 8:3,4) This son is evidently the one referred to in Isaiah 7:4, 8:8 as Immanuel. Concerning this, the JFB commentary states: “prophetess — perhaps the same as the “virgin” (Isaiah 7:14), in the interim married as Isaiah’s second wife: this is in the primary and temporary sense. Immanuel is even in this sense distinct from Maher-shalal-hash-baz. Thus nineteen months at least intervene from the prophecy (Isaiah 7:14), nine before the birth of Immanuel, and ten from that time to the birth of Maher-shalal-hash-baz: adding eleven or twelve months before the latter could cry, ‘Father’ (Isaiah 8:4), we have about three years in all, agreeing with Isaiah 7:15,16.” — Fausset, A. R., A.M. “Commentary on Isaiah 8”. “Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible”. 1871

Concerning Immanuel in verse 8, this same commentary states: “Though temporarily applied to Isaiah’s son, in the full sense this is applicable only to Messiah, that Judea is His, was, and still is, a pledge that, however sorely overwhelmed, it shall be saved at last; the ‘head’ is safe even now, waiting for the times of restoration (Acts 1:6); at the same time these words imply that, notwithstanding the temporary deliverance from Syria and Israel, implied in ‘Immanuel,’ the greatest calamities are to follow to Judah.”

Thus we can see that in Isaiah 8:14, the prophet is probably referring back to Immanuel of verse 8, and not Jehovah of verse 13, since Paul does apply verse 13 to Jesus, not Jehovah.

Now let us look at 2 Peter 2:7,8. We find that what Peter says agrees with what is presented above, and actually adds more proof that the stone being referred to Isaiah 8:14 is Jesus, not Jehovah. This is further attested to by Peter’s reference to Psalm 118:22. In Psalm 118:23, we read that “This is Jehovah’s doing.” Thus, we conclude that the stone of Isaiah 8:14 is the doing of Jehovah, but that the stone is not Jehovah himself.

Rather than making the claim that the above scriptures show that Jesus is Jehovah, the default reasoning should be to conclude that Paul and Peter show that Jehovah is not being spoken of in Isaiah 8:14,15. 

Neverthelss, even we were to assume it Jehovah who is being spoken of in Isaiah 8:14,15, would this actually give reason for us to assume that Jesus is Jehovah? No. The default reasoning is that Jesus is not Jehovah. Nevertheless, when Jesus is representing his Father and God Jehovah, it may be hard to draw a line between the two in terms of how the prophecies apply. For “The one who listens to you listens to Me, and the one who rejects you rejects Me; and he who rejects Me rejects the One who sent Me.” (Luke 10: 16) The rejection of Jesus' followers means the same as rejecting Jesus, and the rejection of Jesus is the same as rejecting the Lord Jehovah who sent Jesus. (Isaiah 61:1) Nothing in this gives cause to believe the followers of Jesus are all Jesus, nor should it give cause to believe that Jesus is the Lord Jehovah who sent him.

Further, we do find many of the scriptures which Jehovah applies to himself are often fulfilled in others, especially Jesus. This does not make Jesus the same being as Jehovah. For instance, in Deuteronomy 32:12 we read: “Jehovah alone did lead him (Israel), There was no foreign god with him.” Yet we also read in Psalm 77:20: “You led your people like a flock, by the hand of Moses and Aaron.” And in Exodus 15:22 we find: “Moses led Israel onward from the Red Sea.” If we put the first and last scripture together, one could assume from the two that Moses is Jehovah. However, as we can ascertain from the scriptures as a whole that Moses is not Jehovah, so we can ascertain from the scriptures as a whole that Jesus is not Jehovah. Indeed, to think that Jesus is Jehovah who sent Jesus would be against the default.
See our study on: Jesus is Not Yahweh

Taken out of context, Jeremiah 21:6 and Jeremiah 52:4-7 could be seen as saying that Nebuchadnezzar is Jehovah, but we know from the context and the rest of the Bible that Jehovah used Nebucadnezzar to fulfill what Jehovah said he was going to do. Likewise, we can see from Romans 9:32,33 and the rest of the Bible that Jesus is not Jehovah, thus we can see Jehovah could use Jesus as the fulfillment of stone of stumbling to Israel, as though the stone were Jehovah himself.

The scriptures abound with cases where Yahweh speaks of various ones as accomplishing what he says that he himself accomplished. Yet by context and the rest of the scriptures we can see that the ones used are not Yahweh. — Exodus 3:10,12; 12:17; 18:10; Numbers 16:28; Judges 2:6,18; 3:9,10; 6:34; 11:29; 13:24,25; 14:6,19; 15:14,18; 16:20,28-30, 2 Kings 4:27; Isaiah 43:11, 45:1-6; etc.

Regardless, there is nothing in Isaiah 8:14 that proves that Jesus is Yahweh, and certainly no reason to add to the scriptures the fable of three persons in one God. There is definitely nothing in the verses about a triune God, or that Yahweh is more than one person.

Friday, April 27, 2018

1 John 2:22-24 – Was John Writing About Denial That Jesus Is Jehovah?

Who is the liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? This is the antichrist: he who denies the Father and the Son. Whoever denies the Son, the same does not have the Father. He who confesses the Son has the Father also. As for you, let that remain in you which you heard from the beginning. If that which you heard from the beginning remains in you, you also will remain in the Son, and in the Father. — 1 John 2:22-24, Restoration Light Improved Version.

One author states concerning the above verses: ‘According to 1 John 2:22-23, belief in the blessed Trinity is not optional but critical to having a true faith toward God.” Another states regarding “apostates”: “According to 1 John 2:22-23 they will deny the Trinity.” Another states: “Beware when you deny the trinity your [sic] not TRULY saved 1 John 2:22.” Another applies 1 John 2:22,23 with belief that Jesus is the Archangel, evidently with the thought that belief in the archangel means one is denying the Father and the Son. Another states concerning 1 John 2:22,23: “Their heresy—they denied the Trinity!” One provides 1 John 2:22,23 as support of the statement: “To deny the Trinity is a mark of an antichrist and a cult, and it is a denial of God.” Another claims regarding 1 John 2:22, “if you take it at face value, whoever denies the Trinity is antichrist.” One states in relation to 1 John 2:22: “It is clear to me that Satan will do everything in his power to deny the trinity of God and will cause many people to fall into deception to believe this lie that there is not a trinity.”

Thus, it would seem that many see either the “the trinity” in 1 John 2:22-23, and/or that they see Jesus as being the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Exodus 3:13,14) in 1 John 2:22-23. The trinitarian often furthers sees in 1 John 2:22-23 that the Father is one person of the triune God, and that Jesus is another person of the triune. And then, based on what they “see” in 1 John 2:22-23, they would claim that anyone else who does not “see” this must be antichrist, or, at least not Christian. It should be obvious, however, that many trinitarians and oneness believers are “seeing” something in what John wrote that is not stated. As of yet, we have not found anyone who has ever attempted to explain what it is in 1 John 2:22-23 that refers to any triune God, or that Jesus is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Indeed, it appears to be simply presumed, and the presumption is taken for granted.

Actually, John wrote nothing at all about denying the trinity; he wrote noting at all about denying that Jesus is Jehovah; he wrote nothing at all about there being two, or three persons, in one God; he wrote nothing at all about Jesus as being the God of Abraham. Indeed, throughout the New Testament, the Father of Jesus is always presented as being the God of Abraham; not once do we find any scripture that identifies Jesus as being the God of Abraham (although many read that thought into many scriptures).

Thus, plainly there is nothing 1 John 2:22-24 that says anything at all about denying belief in an alleged “Blessed Trinity"! There is nothing at all in 1 John 2:22-24 about a trinity nor is there anything there at all that says anything about Jesus being the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

Does 1 John 2:22-24 mean that if one believes that Jesus is the Archangel, that one is denying the Father and the Son? Absolutely not! There is nothing at all in 1 John 2:22-24 nor anywhere else in the Bible that would mean that Jesus is not Michael the Archangel.

See our studies on Michael the Archangel

We can only conclude that that many are presuming that the dogma of men is the basis of faith and thus that they imagining beyond what is written that 1 John 2:22-24 condemns any who disagree that dogma. — 1 Corinthians 4:6.

Do the scriptures ever present such an idea that Jesus has to be the God of Abraham in order to save mankind? Absolutely not! Such has been imagined, assumed, added to, and read into some scriptures, but in reality, the only requirement for the sent savior is that he be a sinless man, who unlike Adam, is kept righteous by obedience to the God of Abraham. Indeed, by adding to the Scriptures that Jesus is the God of Abraham, one, in effect, annuls the scripture tells us that Jesus condemned sin in the flesh, for Jesus would have, in effect, demonstrated that in order to obey Jehovah, that man has to be Jehovah. This would not condemn sin in the flesh, but rather it would justify sin the flesh, proving that the only way that Adam could have obey Jehovah was that Adam would have needed to have been Jehovah.

See:
Did Jesus Have to Be Both God and Man in Order to be the Mediator? (Study not yet restored)

No, John did not write about denying any doctrine of men that has to be imagined, assumed, added to, and read into the scriptures, such as the triune God dogma. He was talking about denying the Son, which, in effect, also denies the Father, since it was the only true God who sent the Son (John 17:1,3), and the only true God performs His works through His Son. — 1 Corinthians 8:6.

Jesus was sent by the Lord Jehovah, speaks for Jehovah as one person who is God and Father, Jesus represents Jehovah, and it was only one person who is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob who raised and glorified His Son. Jesus never claimed to be, nor do the scriptures present Jesus as, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, whom Jesus represents and speaks for. — Deuteronomy 18:15-22; Matthew 22:32; 23:39; Mark 11:9,10; 12:26; Luke 13:35; 20:37; John 3:2,17,32-35; 4:34; 5:19,30,36,43; 6:57; 7:16,28; 8:26,28,38; 10:25; 12:49,50; 14:10; 15:15; 17:8,26; 20:17; Acts 2:22,34-36; 3:13-26; 5:30; Romans 15:6; 2 Corinthians 1:3; 8:6; 11:31; Colossians 1:3,15; 2:9-12; Hebrews 1:1-3; Revelation 1:1.

Let us examine further. John wrote: “Who is the liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ?” “Christ” means “anointed”. Who anointed Jesus, making him the Christ? We find that the Messiah is quoted in Isaiah 61:1 as prophetically stating, “Jehovah ... has anointed me.” (Isaiah 61:1) Jesus applied that prophesy to himself. (Luke 4:18-21; see also: Psalm 45:7; Acts 2:36; 10:38; Hebrews 1:9)  Thus, to deny that Jesus is the Christ is not to deny that Jesus is Jehovah, but to deny that Jesus is the one whom Jehovah anointed and sent.

Indeed, it is the trinitarian that tends toward denying that Jesus really is the Anointed of God, since it would add to what is written in the bible that Jesus is a person of a triune God. Likewise, any who claim that Jesus is Jehovah (Yahweh, as some prefer) would, in effect, tend toward denial that Jesus is the Anointed by Jehovah. Trinitarians try to explain this away by calling upon the spirit of human imagination so as to add to the scriptures that it was not their triune God who anointed Jesus, but that it was only one person of their triune God, the Father, who anointed another person of their triune God, both of whom they claim are “fully God”. Some of the oneness believers, with their spirit of human imagination, have claimed that it is one aspect of God who anointed another aspect of God, etc. Mormons (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints) and some other groups, on the other hand, claim that Jesus is Jehovah, and the Father is not Jehovah, and thus, according to their reasoning, the Lord Jehovah of Isaiah 61:1 could not have possibly anointed Jesus.