Sunday, December 4, 2016

Zechariah 3:2 - Does Jehovah Ask Jehovah to Rebuke Satan?

Jehovah said to Satan, "Jehovah rebuke you, Satan! Yes, Jehovah who has chosen Jerusalem rebuke you! Isn't this a burning stick plucked out of the fire?" -- Zechariah 3:2

This scripture is quoted as proof that Jesus is called "Jehovah" and therefore it is claimed that Jesus is a person of the trinitarian concept of three persons in God. Claims are made that the angel of Jehovah here is Jesus, who supposedly speaks to Satan and says, "Jehovah rebuke you." (Some trinitarians have claimed that "Jehovah" in this context is God the Father, and they claim that the the angel is God the Son, thus it is claimed that two persons of the trinity are spoken of here.)
We should first point out that the above viewpoints are more eisegesis than exegesis, for they read into the verse that the angel of Jehovah is Christ, and then further read into this verse that there is something here about the trinity. There is nothing at all in this or the rest of Zechariah that would point to the idea that the angel of Jehovah who was speaking for Jehovah was in reality Christ, and certainly nothing about the Messiah being a person of his God, Jehovah. Such ideas have to be assumed, although we concede that Jesus could have appeared as an angel of Jehovah in his prehuman existence, but it probably was Gabriel, the angel of Jehovah appeared* in Luke. Regardless, the idea of three persons in one God would have to be read into the verse, for it certainly is not there.
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*See our study:
Angel of Jehovah
Many trinitarians will claim that the angel of Jehovah is the visible form of Jehovah, and Numbers 12:8 and Hebrews 1:3 are given to support this idea. However, there is nothing in Zechariah 3:2 that shows that the Son is called "" (Yahweh, Jehovah). The idea that the angel of Jehovah is Jesus is but an assumption to begin with, and even if the angel of Jehovah was Jesus, at most this would only prove that he was being called Jehovah as the spokesperson for Jehovah.
That the angel of Jehovah is speaking is left "understood" in verse 2, for it is directly stated in verse 3 that it is the "angel" of Jehovah who is speaking and not Jehovah himself. With this thought even many trinitarian translators have agreed, as we show in the translations quoted below:
And the angel of the Lord said to Satan, "May the Lord rebuke you, Satan; may the Lord who has chosen Jerusalem rebuke you! Is not this man a brand snatched from the fire?" -- Confraternity-Douay Version.
And the angel of the Lord said to Satan, "May the Lord rebuke you, Satan; may the Lord who has chosen Jerusalem rebuke you! Is not this man a brand snatched from the fire?" -- New American Bible.
The angel of Jehovah said to Satan, "May Jehovah rebuke you, Satan, may Jehovah rebuke, he who has made Jerusalem his very own. Is not this man a brand snatched from the fire?" -- New Jerusalem Bible.
We also wish to point out that the Syriac Peshitta text also reads "angel of Jehovah", and not just "Jehovah", in Zechariah 3:2.
Regardless, the context shows that it is the angel of Jehovah speaking for Jehovah. (Zechariah 2:3; 3:1,6) One would have to assume that the angel that speaks here was actually Jesus, which is not clearly shown from the scripture itself.
Some parallel this verse with Jude 9, and claim that these two verses show that Jesus is Jehovah. This approach to the scriptures becomes a problem for those trinitarians that do not wish to accept that Jesus is Michael the archangel.* However, many trinitarians do believe that Jesus is Michael the archangel.
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*See our short study on Jude 1:9; see also:
Is Jesus the Archangel - Part 1 * Part 2
If the angel of Jehovah in Zechariah 3:2 is the archangel spoken of in Jude 9, then the angel in Zechariah 3:2 would be Michael the archangel. While it is possible that the angel of Jehovah in Zechariah 3:2 could have been Jesus, we we don't think this to be true. We certainly see nothing here that says that Jesus is Jehovah, and definitely nothing that says that Jesus is a person of Jehovah.

4 comments:

  1. Hi! How is about text of Genesis chapter 18. There is 3 angels, one of them have name Lord according KJV, and NWT from JWorg and Catholic translation say JHVH.

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  2. Hi. I have to point out that the NJB and the NAB do not say 'The angel'. In every translation (except the Septuagint) it ref to YHWH, Jehovah, The Lord, or God as speaking. There is only the 'messanget' (small font) standing before Joshua but verse 2 does not indicate this 'messenger' as being the one to have spoken at all. It specifically says the the God head alone spoke-not some 'angel'.

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    Replies
    1. reply to comment on:
      http://jesusnotyhwh.blogspot.com/2016/12/zec-3-2.html

      Verification of the rendering in the New Jerusalem and New American translations:
      http://www.onlinebiblepassages.com/search.htm?landing=2&no_ads=1&r=1&word=Zechariah+3%3A2
      http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0839/__PUQ.HTM

      Regardless, in harmony with the rest of the Bible, the default conclusion is that it is an angel speaking.

      It is still remains that in the context it is an angel of Jehovah that Joshua is standing before, and who is speaking in verses 4-10, and thus this indicates that it is the angel speaking in verse 2.

      Regardless, it is still true that there is absolutely nothing in Zechariah or anywhere else in the Bible that says that Jehovah is more than one person. It is still true that there is nothing at all in Zechariah that says that Jesus is Jehovah, or that Jesus is a person of Jehovah. It is still true that one has to imagine and assume that this is Jesus speaking. It is still true that one has to imagine this, and imagine that, in order to read into this verse, or any other verse in the entire Bible that Jehovah is more than one person, etc., contrary to 1 Corinthians 8:6, which shows that there is only one person who is the "one God" and distinguishes Jesus from being that "one God" who is the source of all. Jesus is no where in the Bible depicted as being that "one God" who is the source of all. That "one God" does not share such glory with anyone else, not even His firstborn Son. -- Isaiah 42:8; 48:11; Colossians 1:15.

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