Wednesday, November 23, 2016

John 1:1,5 - Light, Darkness and the Logos

The thought is sometimes given that in some vague manner the Logos of John 1:1,5 is the "light" spoken of in Genesis 1:4,5 and that the "darkness" of John 1:5 is the darkness of Genesis 1:2. It should be obvious, however, that in Genesis 1:2 that physical darkness is being referred to, while in John 1:5, the darkness is related to darkness that has come upon the world due to sin and disobedience. Likewise, the "light" refers to Jesus, while he was in the days of his flesh, and not a light that came into existence on the first day of the world that came into existence through the Logos. (John 1:10) Many, e do not seem to think reasonably along this line of thought, and end up claiming that the Logos came into existence in the first day of the world that was created through the Logos, which is self-contradictory. If would have the Logos coming into existence as a result that what which came into existence through the Logos. -- John 1:10.

We do believe that Jesus was the beginning of God's creation, more specifically, the beginning of God's living creation. -- Colossians 1:15; Revelation 3:14.

However, the thought appears to be that Jesus was being alleged to have been the light that was created as spoken of in Genesis 1:3,4, which we have several problems with such a view.
Jesus said, as recorded in Matthew 19:4:

He answered, "Haven't you read that he who made them from the beginning made them male and female, ..."

We can learn from this that Jesus associated "the beginning" with the time of the creation of Adam and Eve. This "beginning" of Genesis 1:1 is further shown in Exodus 20:11: "in six days Jehovah made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them." This shows that the "beginning" spoken of in Genesis 1:1 is the six days that are described in Genesis 1:3 through Genesis 2:1. Adam and Eve's creation was on the last of the six days of creation in which God created the heavens and the earth. Thus, the "beginning" spoken of in Genesis 1:1 is regarding the six days of creation. Jesus, was already with his God and Father (John 17:1,3,5) *before* the "beginning" spoken of in Genesis 1:1 and John 1:1,2, and thus before the first of the six days of creation, before the world of mankind was made.

The six days of creation are speaking of the creation of the "heavens and earth", the sky, the "up above", as seen from the surface, and the land masses and things on those land masses.
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The Genesis account tells nothing about the creation of the planet Earth itself. It says, "In the beginning the Earth was -- without form and void" -- shapeless, empty. It was upon this planet that there was darkness over waters. There were neither mountains nor valleys, trees nor shrubs, rivers nor oceans, but the Earth was. How long before that it had been created, is not stated. The account of the Days of Creation given in Genesis does not relate to the construction of our globe, but to the ordering of it for human habitation. Thus, the scriptures refer to these six days, the beginning, creation, in reference to the creation of the world of mankind (not the sun, moon, stars, etc.), into which world the Logos came. -- Matthew 19:4,8; 24:21; Mark 10:6; 13:19; 16:15; John 1:1,2,10; 17:5; Romans 1:20; 8:19-22; Colossians 1:23; Hebrews 9:11; 2 Peter 3:4.

It was that "heavens and earth" that John 1:10 and John 17:5 speaks of as the "world" that was made "through the Logos," and into which the Logos came. If the light of Genesis 1:3,4 is speaking of the creation of the prehuman Jesus, then it would mean that Jesus created himself, since the "light" spoken of there is part the world that was created through Jesus.
Job 38:4-7 shows that the angelic sons of God were already in existence before the creation of the heavens and earth during the six days of creation.

In the first day, the "brooding" of Holy Energy developed a light of some kind -- but not sunlight. The "light" could have come from the regions of the surface of the waters, as this time element would have a lot of underwater volcanic activity, which may have provided the source for such light. We do not know for sure where this light came from; we are informed that on Day One some form of light was provided, and that it was distinguished from the darkness.

The Sun, however, did not appear in the sky until the Fourth Day, nor are 24-hour "days" actually mentioned until then. We are not to think that the sun, moon, and stars were "created" as an physical bodies on Day Four, but it was it at that time that the fields above the earth became thin enough so that they could be seen in the sky above, as though from man's standpoint upon the earth. The fourth day is actually the first mention of a "days" as we know 24-hour days. (Genesis 1:14-19)  One could assume that the 12-hour day (John 11:9) may have been mentioned earlier on the first day, when God made light to appear on the waters. This light probably was sunlight, but the sun had not yet appeared in the sky until the fourth creative day.
http://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/shamayim.html

John tells us of Jesus that "in him was life, and the life was the light of men." (John 1:4) John says that "we" -- John speaking of himself and the other disciples at that time -- saw his glory. (John 1:14) The "life" spoken of in John 1:4, which provided the "light of men", the "light of the world", does not refer to the celestial glory that Jesus had before he came into the world of mankind (John 1:10; 17:5; 1 Corinthians 15:40), for none of the disciples ever saw that glory, but rather it speaks of the sinless, incorrupt, crown of terrestrial glory that Jesus had as the human son of God, for his terrestrial glory as a human never fell short of the glory of God by sin. -- Romans 3:23; Hebrews 2:9.

For a while, while in the days of his flesh, Jesus had the terrestrial, the earthly glory, but he did not, while in the days of his flesh, have the celestial glory that he had with his Father before the world of mankind was made. If, while in the days of his flesh, Jesus had the celestial glory, why would he ask for that glory to be given to him? (John 17:5) Jesus did indeed again receive that celestial glory when he was raised from the dead, but it would not misleading to say that the glory that he now has is the glory that he had with his Father before the world was made, if one does not at the same time show that this could only be true in the sense of a restored glory. However, the scriptures indicate that the glory that Jesus now has excels the glory he had with his God and Father before the world was made, for now he has been given "the plenitude of mightiness" in his present celestial body of glory that he did not possess when he was with his God and Father before the world was made. -- Colossians 2:9,10.

Jesus, as a human, as most know the scriptures say, was without sin. Unlike dying mankind, Jesus had life, thus in him was life! How thankful we can be that the great Logos, the Word of God, the only direct living creation of God, the one through whom all things were made, when the offer was made, and the "joy set before him," said to his God, "Lo I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me) to do thy will, 0 God." (John 1:1-3, Diaglott Literal; Hebrews 10:7; 12:2; Revelation 3:14). The life and personality of the Logos was then transferred and he became the babe of Bethlehem. "He was made flesh and being found in fashion [likeness] as a man [sinful flesh --Romans 8:3] he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross [stauros]." - John 1:14; Philippians 2:8; Hebrews 2:14.

Jesus' human body was not prepared from sinful human stock, but Jesus says to his God: "But a body did you prepare for me." (Hebrews 10:5) It is thus this sinless human body, having sinless life, that Jesus willingly offered in sacrifice. (Hebrews 10:10) Yes, in Jesus *was* life -- human life, crowned with the glory of a sinless man, who by sinlessness had not fallen short of the glory of God. -- Romans 3:23; Hebrews 2:9.

John 9:5 and 2 Timothy 1:10 are thus related. Since Jesus, unlike Adam, was totally obedient, his sinless human life offered light to the dying race of mankind. Thus Jesus said: "As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world." (John 9:5, New King James version) The good news is that Jesus came with a sinless human life that he could offer in sacrifice to his God on man's behalf in order to atone for the sin of the world. Thus Jesus, while a man, possessed life, and by his continued obedience brought life and incorruption to light. (2 Timothy 1:10) Jesus condemned sin in the flesh by showing that a sinless, incorrupt human can obey God's laws. (Romans 8:3; 2 Timothy 1:10) Jesus, of course, never participated in sinful flesh, but he did have the likeness of sinful flesh in that he suffered and died as a though he were a sinner in order to pay the price for sin.

The word "light" is used in many different ways in the Bible, and is applied in several different ways. In the Old Testament, it was the Law Covenant through which one could obtain life, and thus the Law Covenant is described as a light, a lamp, etc. Most of Psalm 119 could not fully apply to anyone until Jesus came, since no one before Jesus kept that law perfectly, by which he brought life and incorruption to light for mankind.

Of course, Jesus now, like his Father, dwells in the "unapproachable light; whom [which] no man has seen, nor can see" (1 Timothy 6:16), but as such he is not the light of the world, since no human has seen the glory of his present celestial body. (1 Corinthians 15:40) This celestial light, Paul says, no human has seen, nor can see. And yet Paul saw a light as recorded in Acts 26:13, which must have been some kind of manifestation of the light of Jesus' celestial glory, but not the actual substance. At any rate, that light left Paul blinded, so that if he did get a glimpse of that light, it actually shows that no man can look upon that light.

It has been stated, related to Genesis 1:2, that "this wicked world begins and ends it’s day in darkness". This wicked, or "evil age" (Galatians 1:4), however, did not begin until Adam had sinned. God did not make Adam unjust (crooked, corrupted), but he made him just. (Ecclesiastes 7:29) It is only as a result of the sin that came into the world (Romans 5:12) that was made through Jesus (John 1:10) that the world was became corrupted through lust (2 Peter 1:4), and thus sin and its related darkness came cover the earth as a veil of blindness. (Isaiah 25:7; 60:2; 2 Corinthians 4:3,4) As a result of Adam's disobedience, the world came to be corrupted, and the darkness of the evil age began, but that darkness came long after the darkness that is spoken of in Genesis 1:2.

It is claimed that God is light, and that light begets light. We do not know of any scripture that speaks of light begetting light. The idea of "like begets like" is based on the law of reproduction that God placed upon the living creation on the earth. (Genesis 1:11,12,21,25) Trinitarians and some others use that idea to promote the idea that God can only beget God, and thus anything begotten by God has to be God. In reality there is nothing in the Bible that says that the Supreme Being is subject to such an idea, or that the creation of the Logos came by being begotten of the light that is spoken of in Genesis 1:3,4.

At any rate, the "world" that was made through the Logos (Jesus) does not include the Logos. The "light" that was created on the first day of the creation of the world that was made through the Logos is not the Logos through whom the Light was created. The light refers to the surface of the waters on the planet earth, and not to the Logos Himself. This is not to say that Jesus could not have been considered "light" before he became flesh, nor that he is not that he is not now "light", but it is only as flesh that he could fulfill the Law of Jehovah, and bring life and incorruption to light. It is only as flesh that Jesus could be seen in the world, even though the world did not recognize him. (Those who did recognize him became as though "not of the world" due to their becoming new creatures (sons of God), and, as such belong to Christ and the age to come, when all things are made new, and not to this world of darkness -- the present heavens and earth -- that is under condemnation. -- John 1:11; 12:46; 15:19; 17:14; Romans 5:12-17; 2 Corinthians 5:17; 1 Thessalonians 5:5; Hebrews 5:5; 2 Peter 3:7,13; Revelation 21:1-5.

As we have pointed out in other studies, however, Jesus is begotten three times:
(1) as the firstborn creature. -- Colossians 1:15; Proverbs 8:22-25.
(2) of the holy spirit as a human. -- Matthew 1:20.
(3) from the dead when raised from the dead. -- Psalm 2:7; Acts 13:33; Colossians 1:18; Hebrews 1:5; 5:5.

If the idea of light begetting light should be applied, such a thought could be applied to all three begettals, since in all three of his begettals he was never under any condemnation of sin. As Jesus is now, it would be applied to his third begettal in his resurrection. In his original begettal, which was before the laying of the foundation of the present heavens and earth (Proverbs 8:26), which was laid by means of him (Hebrews 1:10), it would have been as the firstborn of all creation. (Colossians 1:15) As a human, he had the full crown of glory as a human being, which glory could be appreciable seen by his disciples, a glory that was never marred by sin. -- Romans 3:23; Hebrews 2:9.

All of the sons of God become sons of light (John 12:36; 1 Thessalonians 5:5), and, as new creatures (2 Corinthians 5:17), are considered the light of the world in this age (Matthew 5:14), and will also be so in the age to come when the world is blessed when those sons of God are made manifest to the world. -- Isaiah 2:4-5; 30:26; 42:6,16; 60:3,19; Romans 8:19; Revelation 21:4.

However, none of this means the exactly the same "light" referred to in Genesis 1:3,4, which is part of the creation of the heavens and earth, the world, that was made through Jesus, except that one could use those scriptures in a typical way, as typifying the coming time when the light of Jehovah will illuminate the earth through Jesus and the saints. Jesus, the Logos, being the means by which Jehovah created the light that is spoken of in Genesis 1:3,4 is not that light that was created through Jesus.

Nevertheless, the scriptures, in speaking of Jehovah as "light", are not usually speaking of his substance -- his being, but they speak symbolically of the illumination of truth, justice and knowledge that proceeds from Jehovah. (Psalm 13:3; 18:28; 27:1; 36:9; 84:11; 118:27; 50:10; 60:19; James 1:17; 1 John 1:5; Revelation 21:23) Likewise, with Jesus and the saints; they reflect the light of truth and justice from Jehovah.

On the other hand, it also appears that light can also refer to the shining glory of God's substance, and thus would illustrate the plane of existence. This is probably what is being referred to in 1 Timothy 6:16. The light in Acts 9:3 and 22:6-11 is not actually stated to be Jesus, but Paul does refer to the glory of that light which he could not see, thus, we can conclude that the light that shone was in some way the glory of Jesus in his celestial body (1 Corinthians 15:40), regardless of whether that light was a manifestation of that glory or whether it was the actual glory. Whether that light was actually Jesus, or a manifestation of his presence, is beside the point, however. That light signified Jesus' glory as a result of his being begotten as the firstborn from the dead, and does not signify that Jesus is being spoken of as the light in Genesis 1:3-4, nor is there anything in the creation of light as part of the six days of the creation of the heavens and earth (Exodus 20:11; 31:7) that were created through Jesus (John 1:10; Hebrews 1:10) mean that Jesus is a part of that creation that was created through him, which is, in reality, a self-contradiction. Jesus was created before "the beginning" of the world (which world became corrupt due to sin) spoken of in Genesis 1:1, Matthew 24:21; Mark 10:6; 13:19; John 1:1,10; 17:5; Romans 5:12; Ephesians 2:2,3; Hebrews 1:10; 4:3 (this verse shows that the "world" is in reference to "the heavens and earth" of Genesis 1:1; compare Genesis 1:31; Exodus 20:11); 2 Peter 1:4; 2:20; 3:4; 1 John 4:9,14.

Genesis 1:2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness covered the surface of the watery depths, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the surface of the waters.
Genesis 1:3 Then God said, "Let there be light," and there was light.
Genesis 1:4 God saw that the light was good, and God separated the light from the darkness.
Genesis 1:5 God called the light "day," and He called the darkness "night." Evening came, and then morning: the first day. -- Holman Christian Standard Bible translation.

One should at least not question that the light and the darkness referred to in Genesis 1:3-5 is relative to the darkness that is spoken of in Genesis 1:2, which is speaking of the physical world, not the spiritual world. The darkness and the light is spoken of relative to the planet earth, which was covered with water, and darkness. The light spoken of in Genesis 1:3 is still concerning that same place, the earth and the darkness over the waters.

That darkness over the surface of the waters is believed to have been caused by a layer of gases or dust particles (or a mixture of both) surrounding the earth above, keeping the light of the sun from shining upon the surface of those waters. Such a canopy would have been kept in place by a strong magnetic field.

The "day" and the "night" spoken of in Genesis 1:5 could be the the (averaged) 12-hour days and 12-hour nights (John 11:9) that we are generally speak of, since God created the material universe, including the sun, moon, the planet earth and all stars, long before the "beginning" that spoken of in Genesis 1:1.  One of the explanations for this light is that the canopy above dispersed enough at this point to allow the sunlight through, but as yet, the sun itself was not made to appear in the sky; the sun was made to appear in the sky on the fourth day.

In each stage to the six days of creation, God worked with already existing materials; the six days of creation is not about the bringing forth out of nothing physical creations. The six days are about the ordering of the earth and its heavens (sky), the founding of the world that was made through Jesus.

On the first day, the planet earth already was, and the darkness already existed on the planet earth, which was void and covered with liquid.

On the second day, God does not bring anything forth out of nothing, but he works with the already existing materials, causing a separation between the vapors below and above, creating an expanse, why he calls the heavens, the sky. On the third, again the "land" was already in existence below the depths, but it was not "dry" land until God brought that land to the surface. It was not until it became "dry land" that it was called "earth."

All six days, including the first day is describing the founding, the ordering, of the earth and its sky, as shown in Exodus 20:11: "In six days Jehovah made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day." (See also Exodus 31:17) Hebrews 4:3 speaks of this same event, saying that God's "works were finished from the foundation [the act of putting into place] of the world." The word "world" in Hebrews 4:3, in effect, replaces the term "heavens and earth" as given in Genesis 1:1. This word is a translation of the Greek word usually transliterated as "Kosmos." (Strong's #2889) This word refers to an "arrangement of things", and thus speaks of the arranging of the heavens and earth, including the things and dominions therein. It is this "world" that has became corrupted through Adam's sin. (2 Peter 1:4) It is also this same "world", that was created through Jesus. (John 1:3,10; Hebrews 1:10) Since this world was created during the six days, the first day is included in that creation. Since that creation was created through Jesus, then Jesus was not a part of that creation, but had already been created earlier.

Placing spiritual revealing with spiritual revealing, we can conclude that creation took place in the following order: First, the creation of the material universe. Isaiah 44:24 indicates that Jehovah was all alone at this creation. Thus, this creation came into existence before there was any other living creature. Second, the firstborn creature was brought into existence, before the rest of the living creation. (Colossians 1:15-17) Third: Since the angelic sons of God are spoken of as already existing when the ordering of the earth had begun (Job 38:4-7), we can conclude that these were brought forth through the firstborn creature before the "beginning" spoken of in Genesis 1:1 and John 1:1. Fifth: the creation of the heavens and earth -- the world, kosmos -- as spoken of in Genesis 1:1; Exodus 20:11; 31:17; John 1:3,10; Hebrews 1:10; 4:3. It is this latter "creation" that is usually referred by the term "creation" in the New Testament. The only exceptions appear to be Colossians 1:15-17, which includes the invisible living creation also, the references to one who belongs to Christ as a new creation. (2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 6:15; possibly Hebrews 4:13) in second 2 Peter 2:13, the word is used in reference to ordinances create); and the one to Jesus as the beginning of God's creation. (Revelation 3:14) To repeat, most instances where the Greek word for "creation" -- ktisis -- appears in the New Testament occurs, it does not include the angelic sons of God; in all other instances, it is referring to the visible world of mankind. (Mark 10:6; 13:19; 16:15; Romans 1:20,25; 8:19,20,21,22; Colossians 1:23; Hebrews 4:13; 9:11; 2 Peter 3:4; in 1 Peter 2:13, the word is used in reference to ordinances created by man) Also, it is this latter "creation" -- the visible world of mankind -- that is usually referred to by the use of the word "kosmos" (world) in New Testament.

It is claimed that the light is not physical light since the sun was created until the fourth day. This has already been discussed. But if the "light" of Genesis 1:3 is "spiritual light" rather than "physical light", then what about the "darkness" that was upon the physical earth, covering the physical liquid? To assume that the first day in Genesis 1:1 is being spoken of in some spiritual sense, however, is an assumption, and if assumed, to be consistent, the entire six days would become spiritual rather than physical -- no physical separating of the waters above from the waters below; no physical bringing forth of dry land, no physical bringing forth of sea creatures, flying creature, land creature, no physical creation of man from physical dust, etc. (And there are some who claim this; if however there was no first man Adam through whom sinned enter into the world, then there is no basis for the ransom sacrifice of Jesus.) However, the context, as well as the testimony of the entire Bible, shows that this light is related to the darkness that was covering the physical watery depths, and that this light caused a separation in that darkness.

While we believe that each of the six days of creation are literal, we believe that each of these days cover thousands of years according to the way we usually reckon time.

On the fourth day, God made the sun, moon and stars in the sky. As with the other days, it is not referring to the actual physical bodies as being created on that day, but God made them to appear in the sky. Applying this to the canopy theory, the gases/dust surrounding the earth allowed the sun, moon and stars to be appear in the sky at that time. It is only in reference to the vantage point of the surface the earth that they are called "sun", "moon" and "stars" in the Bible. They were made, brought forth in the sky -- heavens -- the up above -- on the fourth day.

If one wishes to think that the darkness of Genesis 1:2-5 is speaking about a spiritual/religious darkness related to the present wicked evil age (Greek transliterated:Aion) (Galatians 1:4), this would imply that the corrupted world was already in existence before the first day of the world that was made through Jesus, a self-contradiction. And, if the light is supposed to refer to the creation of the Logos, then it would further imply that the Logos was created to offset that the darkness of the corrupted world, which would have been in existence before Jesus was created to offset their darkness. And since evil would imply intelligent beings who were instigating such evil, it would further imply that these were other living beings created before Jesus, and these living beings were involved in spiritual religious darkness. Further, it would imply that the world (kosmos) was already corrupted before the six days of creation and that this present evil age was in existence before the six days of creation. In effect, it would mean that Jehovah was lying when he said that the world that was created through Jesus was "good" (not "evil"). (Genesis 1:4,12,18,21,25,31) Good is contrasted with the idea of evil in Genesis 2:9,17; 3:5,22. I am not sure how the idea that the darkness and light in Genesis 1:2-5 can be related to such a religious spiritual darkness, and yet be in keeping with the context of the scripture, as well be in harmony with the rest of the scriptures. True light from the scriptures is seen from by comparing spiritual revealing with spiritual revealing (1 Corinthians 2:13), not by confusing the scriptures to such an extent that they are made to appear to be self-contradictory and in confusion with one another. We should recognize how what God has revealed in the scriptures should be in viewed harmoniously, to the glory of the God of peace (1 Corinthians 14:23; Romans 15:1; Jeremiah 13:16), and to avoid any view that would take the light God has revealed in the scriptures and confuse the scriptures in such a way that they are no longer in harmony.

It has been claimed that the light in Genesis 1 refers to the revealing of the glory of the Messiah from the foundation of the world. We do not know of any scripture that refers to that light in Genesis 1 as revealing the glory of messiah before the foundation of the world. To whom was the glory being revealed, if at that time, Jesus, being the first creation, the beginning of the creation, was all alone among creation? Was his glory being revealed to his Creator in the darkness of the Creator? Was the Creator in darkness? Who was he revealed to before the world was made through Jesus, if Jesus was all alone among creation, being the beginning of God's creation? Of course, we do believe that Jesus was the beginning of God's creatures, that is, of his living creation, but Jesus was not created in, or as a part of, the present world of spiritual darkness. He, as well as the other spirit beings, were already in the existence at the beginning spoken of in Genesis 1:1 and John 1:1. Jesus' creation was not part of that "beginning", since all the things pertaining to that "beginning" were created through Jesus. There was no spiritual, or more correctly symbolic, darkness at the beginning of the first day of creation. That darkness spoken of in Genesis 1:2-5 was upon the surface of the waters of the physical planet earth.

Simply, the six days of creation relate to the physical things upon the planet earth that were created through, by means of, the one who was to become the Messiah. Jesus was not the Messiah, nor the light of the world, until he became flesh so that he could be that light of the world. Jesus was not the light of the world when God created that Light that is spoken of in Genesis 1 through the one who was become the light of the world.

It is being claimed that God spoke the Logos into existence on the first day of creation, when he said "Let there be light."  Although we hear or read of those who say that God “spoke” the Logos into existence, or, that God spoke the world into existence, as yet what that is supposed to mean is not at all made clear. Nevertheless, the scriptures do not say that God spoke the Logos into being. The Logos was already in existence at the beginning spoken of in John 1:1 and Genesis 1:1. That beginning, in which God created the heavens and earth, is stated to include all six days of creation, including the first day. (Exodus 20:11; 31:17) The first day was not before the beginning of the world that was made through the Logos, but the first day was included in the beginning of the world that was made through the Logos. (John 1:10; 17:5) The Logos was was not brought into being as part of the creation through the Logos on the first day.

See the following studies:
Related study:

One has commented that it is quite evident that "natural light" was not created until the fourth creative day. (Genesis 1:14-19) We do not believe this to be true, and we have already given the reasons above as to why we believe that this is not true. We suggest that one re-examine what we have already presented, and the links to other studies regarding creation. One first needs to realize that the “beginning” spoken of in Genesis 1:1 is not speaking of the material universe, nor of the creation of “light” itself, but of “light” as it would be seen on the planet earth. One needs to realize that the making of the sun, moon and stars to appear on the fourth day is not speaking of the creation of the sun, the moon and star themselves, but of the creation of the sun, the moon and stars as seen in the sky (heavens) of from the surface of the planet earth.

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